The age old question answered: What kind of dog is goofy?

Wil Wheaton once asked; “Pluto’s a dog, Mickey’s a mouse, Donald’s a duck. What’s Goofy?” So, what kind of dog is goofy? The real identity of this clumsy but loveable comic relief has been met with a lot of controversies.

Some folks have gone so far as to suggest “goofy is a cow”—an Aberdeen Angus cow but according to Disney Mouse lines, goofy is a dog with human features. Since he doesn’t look like any specific breed, we’ll call him a mutt—mixed breed. Let’s see how goofy’s personality compares with that of a mutt.​

Mixed breeds are unique​

Mixed-breeds

Goofy defies reason, just like mixed breed dogs. They don’t look like any other dogs—you can’t accurately pinpoint which breeds their genetic pool comes from.

Mutts often have a “middle-of-the-fence” behavior and temperament, unlike their purebred counterparts. The temperamental extremes found in purebred dogs are because they are specifically selected so as to express specific behavior. For instance, chasing instincts, digging instincts and high energy are needed for the working behavior of purebreds—like hunting dogs.​

Whereas mongrels, have a more laid back and “anything goes” temperament because their innate instincts have been dulled down. Plus, their instincts aren’t as strongly “programmed” like those of purebred dogs which make them adapt easily and fit in a variety of living conditions and households.

When breeding purebred, the standard is usually to reproduce the same quality in temperament and appearance. A mixed breed is unique in this aspect because there are no standards which make them awesome. Additionally, when you are going to adopt a mutt from a shelter you have varied selection choices than with a breeder.

Just look at goofy, from his orange turtleneck, black vest, blue pants, brown shoes, white gloves, and a rumpled fedora for a hat. Even his southern drawl is unique—for a dog and lets’ not forget his “harsh” and “A-yuck!”.​

Mixed breeds can compete

Mixed breed dogs invited to compete (Source: Youtube.com)

if you think to compete in a dog competition you need a purebred, then you are mistaken! Mixed breeds are just as capable as other dogs when it comes to tests of agility and obedience. Remember they come from a blend of a diverse gene pool so you get something inimitable.

If other dogs can learn to compete so can your mutt. It all depends on the approach you use. The key thing to remember is that like people, dogs have different personalities. Your mutt is an individual so don’t be quick to judge his temperament based on how he looks.

You should exercise patience and love your mutt on his terms—don’t think of him regarding a particular breed. He will surprise you, love you and you will reap the joys of living with this canine companion.

When you’re training your mutt for competitions think of him like goofy. Remember how goofy went to great lengths when trying out new activities (e.g. his “how to” cartoons) and even greater lengths to execute it properly. Don’t get frustrated when he gets it wrong, he will get it right eventually it just requires a bit more patience.

Ps: your mixed breed can now become a therapy or service dog—it’s no longer limited to only purebreds.

Mixed breeds awesomeness is contagious​

Some breeds can be independent and aloof even though they’ve had the same pet parent since puppyhood; some are bonded to a single individual and indifferent towards others; while others have enough love to go around. Mixed breeds are among the latter. They are after the adventure in all of us.

They are nature’s wonderful design and a testament to mother nature’s divine inspiration without any input. Mixed breeds are known to be kid-friendly dogs; stable enough to handle the playful punishment from children—we all know toddlers can be brutal with pets. Mutts are even calm towards the screaming and running of children.

No wonder we all love goofy! Aside from that goofy is extremely charming, very loveable, and his clumsiness only adds to his appeal.

Whenever you get a purebred, you’re asking for a specific temperament that has been developed for years and is done through strict breeding practices. However, with a mutt there is a lot of unknowns and their spontaneity will make you love them even more—and you will contract some of that awesomeness by association.​

Forest Gump once said “A mixed breed puppy is like a box of chocolates. You never know what you’re gonna get.”​

Mixed breeds can be overprotective​

The protective nature of dogs is largely dependent on the dog itself. Depending on its gene pool, some can be overly protective or defensive while others are more prey oriented. However, with that being said, all dogs can be trained for specific tasks—like protection, but some breeds are better suited for that role.

First and foremost, dogs are individuals. With mixed breeds, you’re not sure what you get; you may be lucky to get a dog that has the physical and mental abilities required to be a guard dog and sometimes he may be a hot mess.

But all dogs have the protective instinct in them—try and touch her nursing pups and you will see the wrath she will rain on you. Do you remember how goofy was with his son Max? Even though goofy is usually carefree, he has a serious side which is often seen with his son.​

Mixed breeds also have a serious side when it’s necessary and like with every maternal/paternal relationship, there can be some friction with your mutt. Just be sure to understand your furry friend and don’t let the friction destroy your bond.

Overall, mixed breeds have an excellent genetic diversity. They include a little bit of this and that which is why they are generally healthier. But if you want a good dog with a specific skill set then you would be better off with a respective dog breed. Lastly, if you’re more of the adventurous type and are willing to accept whatever characteristics a dog might present then a mixed dog breed may be the way to go. Who know you might just grow fond of him like we did with goofy!​

Image Source: https://pixabay.com

  • Updated January 29, 2017
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